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What is Native Advertising and How is it Different from Traditional Ads?

We will define what native advertising is in second…

But first…

Let’s define what native advertising is NOT…

It’s not ad banners, pop-up ads, social ads, etc. which present a clear offer.

But rather it’s form and function matches that of the platform it’s being presented on.

It’s still created with the intent to be an advertisement with the goal of presenting an offer, however it’s more subtle and is less direct.

Disguised if you will…

By the way there’s absolutely nothing wrong with a direct ad which contains a clear offer.

However most people prefer to not be bombarded with in your face ads.

Actually there is, it’s the fact that the click through rates are not very good and have been on the decline since 2008…

So there’s a clear benefit to using native ads because they usually will deliver some sort of value before selling you something.

Native ads just don’t get ignored like traditional ads because they don’t look like ads.

They provide content that everyone is seeking out, stuff that informs, inspires, and entertains.

Basically native ads are a hybrid of traditional ads and content marketing mashed up.

There’s services like Outbrain and Taboola that specialize in delivering native ads on large sites like CNN, NBC News, etc.

However you can get started on your own by utilizing social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and YouTube.

The trick is to make your ad look like it’s simply sharing some good content of value which is what we all expect to see in our social accounts.

25% of consumers are more likely to view a native ad and 18% of consumers will convert better from a native ad than from a traditional ad.

So I think it’s pretty clear how much of an advantage you gain from running native ads over traditional ads which present a clear offer.

How are you using native advertising in your business?

 

Growth Hacking Defined – This is what it takes to be a Growth Hacker

Growth Hacking by definition from Wikipedia is a process of rapid experimentation across marketing channels and product development to identify the most effective, efficient ways to grow a business.  Growth hacking refers to a set of both conventional and unconventional marketing experiments that lead to growth of a business.

Growth Hackers often focus on low-cost alternatives to traditional marketing, e.g. using social media, viral marketing, or targeted advertising instead of buying through more traditional media such as radio, newspaper, and television.

Now that we have that defined let’s really get into what “Growth Hacking” is all about and how you too can become a “Growth Hacker.”

But first here’s a little history about the term “Growth Hacker.”

A gentleman by the name of Sean Ellis first coined the term in 2010.  He is the founder and CEO of GrowthHackers.com and was previously the founder and CEO of Qualaroo.com.

Sean defined a Growth Hacker as “A person whose true north is growth.  Everything they do is scrutinized by its potential impact on scalable growth.”

I, on the other hand personally like to think of a Growth Hacker as someone who has cross-disciplinary skills with 1 goal and 1 goal only: to grow a startup or a business.

Now you may not agree with my definition and that’s OK, please write a comment below or contact me about it.  I am in now way saying that this is the be all and end all of how to define Growth Hacking; it’s just what I believe it is.

With that being said, let’s move on shall we?

Growth Hacking is not a magical formula or a few lines of code that you can inject into your website or application and get instant traffic.

As a Growth Hacker, your job isn’t necessarily to focus on quantity but rather you should be focusing on quality.

And in this case quality is defined as having customers/users who actually are happy with the product or service you or your company is producing.

Growth Hacking is a mix between marketing, engineering, data analysis, and creativity.

Growth Hacking is NOT the same as traditional marketing even if traditional marketing strategies are often used in “growth hacking.”

Growth Hacking is NOT unethical even though it can be used in an unethical way.

In conclusion, the ultimate goal of a Growth Hacker is to find a predictable, repeatable, and scalable growth process.

How do you define “Growth Hacking?” What ideas came to mind when reading this post to help you become a “Growth Hacker?”